SwissCollNet si impegna a migliorare l'accessibilità delle collezioni di storia naturale. Una visione comune e una strategia a lungo termine promuoveranno l'uso delle collezioni di storia naturale per la ricerca, l'insegnamento e la società.

Immagine: OscarLoRo, stock.adobe.com

The Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT) and a large network of experts from museums, botanical gardens, institutions of higher education and partners have joined forces to launch SwissCollNet, the Swiss Natural History Collections Network.

With more than 60 million specimens of animals, plants, fungi, rocks, soil samples and fossils, Switzerland’s museums, universities, and botanical gardens store a remarkable scientific and patrimonial national treasure. However, less than one in five of these objects is digitized. This means that a large part of some unique data on biodiversity and the environment is not easily accessible for research, education and society.

SwissCollNet aims to unite all Swiss natural history collections, large or small, under a shared vision and with a common strategy to promote their importance, harness their scientific value for research and develop their educational potential for science and society.

Contatto

SCNAT
Rete svizzera delle collezioni di storia naturale (SwissCollNet)
Casa delle Accademie
Laupenstrasse 7
3008 Berna

+41 31 306 93 39
E-mail

Rimanere informato

News

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