SwissCollNet is committed to improving the accessibility of natural history collections. A common vision and long-term strategy will promote the use of natural history collections for research, education and society.

Image: OscarLoRo, stock.adobe.com

The Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT) and a large network of experts from museums, botanical gardens, institutions of higher education and partners have joined forces to launch SwissCollNet, the Swiss Natural History Collections Network.

With more than 60 million specimens of animals, plants, fungi, rocks, soil samples and fossils, Switzerland’s museums, universities, and botanical gardens store a remarkable scientific and patrimonial national treasure. However, less than one in five of these objects is digitized. This means that a large part of some unique data on biodiversity and the environment is not easily accessible for research, education and society.

Objectives

  • Promote modern standards in management and curation of collections
  • Modernise and digitise natural history collections
  • Provide open access to harmonised specimen data of Swiss institutions through an online-portal, the Swiss Virtual Natural History Collection (SVNHC)
  • Promote and support the scientific potential of collections for research
  • Integrate the Swiss natural history collections into international initiatives

Contact

SCNAT
Swiss natural history collections network (SwissCollNet)
House of Academies
Laupenstrasse 7
3008 Bern
Switzerland

+41 31 306 93 39
E-mail

Stay informed

News

Imaging station at the ETHZ-ENT in Zürich
The Confederation supports SwissCollNet and its digital platform of natural science collections for research

The federal government is promoting an improved access to natural science collections with a total amount of CHF 12.37 million until 2024. The digitised collections provide unique data for climate,

Entomologische Sammlung
Schweiz nutzt naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen schlecht

Die Schweiz nutzt ihre mit über 60 Millionen Objekten umfangreichen naturwissenschaftlichen Sammlungen schlecht. Gegenwärtig sind nur 17 Prozent der Objekte digital erfasst und damit für wissenschaftliche Auswertungen wirklich zugänglich. Dies